"Most people have learned how to live in the moment. The argument goes that if the past has uncertain effect on the present, there is no need to dwell on the past. And if the present has little effect on the future, present actions need not be weighed for their consequence. Rather, each act is an island in time, to be judged on its own. Families comfort a dying uncle not because of a likely inheritance, but because he is loved at that moment. Employees are hired not because of their résumés, but because of their good sense in interviews. Clerks trampled by their bosses fight back at each insult, with no fear for their future. It is a world of impulse. It is a world of sincerity. It is a world in which every word spoken speaks just to that moment, every glance given has only one meaning, each touch has no past or future, each kiss is a kiss of immediacy."
Alan Lightman, Einstein’s Dreams: A Novel
"Like wildflowers; You must allow yourself to grow in all the places people thought you never would."
Unknown  (via arcane-wanderer)

virtuouslyvindicated:

justshy:

latestbutgreatest:

eurotrottest:

gang0fwolves:

thechocolatarian:

phattygirls:

BROKE HER DOWN!

LMAO!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

LOOOOL she is me and i is her

When she wiped her leg though! 😂😂

lol

I AM CRYINGGGGGGGG!!! KYM IS A FOOOOOL!

Pregnant Woman Allegedly Put In Chokehold By NYPD for Barbecuing
Pregnant Woman Allegedly Put In Chokehold By NYPD for Barbecuing

A New York City police officer allegedly placed a 27-year-old pregnant woman in a chokehold Saturday after she was accused of illegally grilling in East New York, Brooklyn. The incident was captured on camera.

Photos first published by the New York Daily News appear to show an unidentified member of the New York City Police Department wrapping his arms around Rosan Miller’s neck and upper torso as her daughter watches nearby. Miller was uninjured but was given a summons for disorderly conduct, the outlet reported.

“She was grilling in front of her home, not committing any crime,” former City Councilman Charles Barron told The New York Post of the incident. “We want these people out of our community.”

Use of the chokehold by New York police officers has been banned for more than 20 years, according to Reuters. Yet the outlet reports that the department has a “backlog” of chokehold complaints currently under investigation.

The latest chokehold incident comes just over a week after Staten Island man Eric Garner died while being placed in a chokehold by a member of the NYPD. At the time, Garner was being arrested on charges stemming from illegal cigarette sales. A bystander captured the incident on video.

After a meeting with Garner’s family and federal prosecutors in Brooklyn on Friday, activist Rev. Al Sharpton called for an end to the use of the chokehold nationwide.

"We cannot just depend — and this is important — on police policy to stop the choke hold," Sharpton said, per Reuters. "We need a federal precedent."

From another site

“It’s incredible because the whole incident started off because they were barbecuing on a small grill in front of their home,” former City Councilman Charles Barron told WCBS 880 of the latest incident.

“We have a video showing an officer going up the steps of her house, she getting in front of him, saying, ‘I don’t want you in my house.’ She gets in front of him. He grabs her arm, pulls her down the steps, wrestling with her, gets her in a choke hold and then, after, she fights her way out of the choke hold. And then he enters her house without a warrant or permission from her, and then she comes out handcuffed.” 

Barron claimed Miller was not doing anything wrong.

“Since when is barbecuing against the law?” Barron said.

A melee with police allegedly erupted involving the woman’s brother and husband. Rosan Miller received a summons for disorderly conduct. Her brother, John Miller, was charged with harassment and obstruction of justice. Her husband, Moses Miller, was charged with resisting arrest.

Rosan Miller was not hurt in the incident, according to reports.

Police are reportedly reviewing the incident.

NPR Science: Sorry, Lucy: The Myth Of The Misused Brain Is 100 Percent False

  • ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:
  • If you went to the movie theater this weekend, you might've caught the latest Scarlett Johansson action movie called "Lucy." It's about a woman who develops superpowers by harnessing the full potential of her brain.
  • (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
  • SCARLETT JOHANSSON: I'm able to do things I've never done before. I feel everything and I can control the elements around me.
  • UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's amazing.
  • WESTERVELT: You've probably heard this idea before. Most people only use 10% of their brains. The other 90% of the basically dormant. Well, in the movie "Lucy," Morgan Freeman gives us this what-if scenario?
  • (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
  • MORGAN FREEMAN: What if there was a way of accessing 100% of our brain? What might we be capable of?
  • DAVID EAGLEMAN: We would be capable of exactly what we're doing now, which is to say, we do use a hundred percent of our brain.
  • WESTERVELT: That is David Eagleman.
  • EAGLEMAN: I'm a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine.
  • WESTERVELT: And he says, basically, all of us are like Lucy. We use all of our brains, all of time.
  • EAGLEMAN: Even when you're just sitting around doing nothing your brain is screaming with activity all the time, around the clock; even when you're asleep it's screaming with activity.
  • WESTERVELT: In other words, this is a total myth. Very wrong, but still very popular. Take this clip from an Ellen DeGeneres stand-up special.
  • (SOUNDBITE OF STAND-UP SPECIAL)
  • ELLEN DEGENERES: It's true, they say we use ten percent of our brain. Ten percent of our brain. And I think, imagine what we could accomplish if we used the other 60 percent? Do you know what I'm saying?
  • AUDIENCE: (LAUGHTER).
  • (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
  • DAVID SPADE: Let's say the average person uses ten percent of their brain.
  • WESTERVELT: It's even in the movie "Tommy Boy."
  • (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
  • SPADE: How much do you use? One and a half percent. The rest is clogged with malted hops and bong residue.
  • WESTERVELT: Ariana Anderson is a researcher at UCLA. She looks at brain scans all day long. And she says, if someone were actually using just ten percent of their brain capacity...
  • ARIANA ANDERSON: Well, they would probably be declared brain-dead.
  • WESTERVELT: Sorry, "Tommy Boy." No one knows exactly where this myth came from but it's been around since at least the early 1900's. So why is this wrong idea still so popular?
  • ANDERSON: Probably gives us some sort of hope that if we are doing things we shouldn't do, such as watching too much TV, alcohol abuse, well, it might be damaging our brain but it's probably damaging the 90 percent that we don't use. And that's not true. Whenever you're doing something that damages your brain, it's damaging something that's being used, and it's going to leave some sort of deficit behind.
  • EAGLEMAN: For a long time I've wondered, why is this such a sticky myth?
  • WESTERVELT: Again, David Eagleman.
  • EAGLEMAN: And I think it's because it gives us a sense that there's something there to be unlocked, that we could be so much better than we could. And really, this has the same appeal as any fairytale or superhero story. I mean, it's the neural equivalent to Peter Parker becoming Spiderman.
  • WESTERVELT: In other words, it's an idea that belongs in Hollywood.